Advertising is a key component to a successful business. This is true today and was true through the past 130 years. Albert Pope knew this and advertised his Columbia’s in print to almost unprecedented levels. Several of these adds can be seen on another page of this site.

  Paper was not the only way to get the public familiar with Columbia bicycles. During and after Col. Popes life a wide and sometimes strange variety of materials were used to get the message across.  On this page are some of the items I have collected pertaining to the Columbia bicycle.

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Jewelry. There were many buttons*, lapel pins and other items to wear on ones clothing to show brand loyalty.
 
 
*Please see the "Collectables, Pins and Lapel Buttons" page.

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Many people collect spoons and still do. This Sterling plate spoon from early in the 20th century promotes Columbia Bicycles.

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Every desk had a paperweight. Both a young Albert Pope and one from later years describe his importance to both the bicycle industry as well as automobiles and better roads.

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Card games were popular in victorian times. Game counters were used to keep score. This one would remind everyone playing that Columbia bicycles were the ones to buy.

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 Below is another style game counter, this one made of cardboard.

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 There was a lot of cigar smoking during that card game. Even when you put your smoke down you would be reminded of Columbia bicycles or even other Pope products like Pope Automobiles as in the upper ashtray. I'm pretty sure the one on the lower left is not an ashtray because of the lack of indentations to hold the smokes. It may be a tip tray or a general purpose desk tray that could hold paper clips or whatever you would want. 

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An 1890’s “Tip Tray” made of brass with a porcelain inset.  On the back is has the makers mark of “D’NARA DIAL CO.     WALTHAM MASS.

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In the Westfield Mfg. Co. era bicycle manufacturing emphasis had shifted to kids bikes and so did the promotions. In 1948 adds in cartoon form were in the back of comic books. You could send away for a free catalog or for a few cents a realy neat whistle.

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Also from 1948 is this Rules of the Road card meant to teach bicycle safety to kids. A Columbia bike is featured.

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For the 75th Anniversary in 1952 employees received either a tie tack or bracelet. The tie tack pictured was given to my father at the time he worked there.

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Below is a Paperweight that was also produced for the 1952 75th Anniversary

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In 1974 belt buckles were given to the management at Columbia Bicycles. Some of the first issued had an interesting mistake and said "Westfield Conn." on the back instead of "Westfield Mass".

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A coffee mug from the 1960's.

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 In the late 1900's many household ceramic items were available with Columbia Bicycle advertising on them. Made in England about 1898 this collection included Milk Pitchers, Soap Dishes, Ashtrays and Canisters. I'm still on the lookout for any other items in this collection that I don't have.
 
 They came in both red and blue artwork, all with the same design. These are some of the items from this set that I have collected over the years.
 
 

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  Columbia Magnifying Glass (plastic). 

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Desk blotters from the early 1920's

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The Columbia "Wings" ornament was standard on all models from 1929 - 1931.

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 Trade cards were used quite often to advertise bicycles. This pair is from the early 1880's. Both have the same front but different backs.

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 More trade cards from the 1880's.

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                                                                       Trade card from 1886

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1977 was Columbia's 100 year Anniversary. This leather bound nail clipper/knife set was issued in 1977.

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Paper dolls from a series of 6 that was produced to promote bicycling for women. Each displayed a designer fashion outfit made especially for Women’s bicycle riding. These were available by mail for 2 cents in the mid-1890’s.

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 This is a bicycle race medal from 1897 given by Pope Mfg. Co. Bicycle racing was a popular sport in the 1890’s. This medal was given to E.A. Strong for winning a 2 mile race in 5.23 on June 5th, 1897.

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 In the early days of bicycling every bike came with it's own tool kit just as automobiles and motorcycles did. If you owned and operated your own machine you did need to be mechanically inclined. 

 Here is some Pope Wrenches and tools that would have been in these kits. 

 

 

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 All of the above wrenches were made by a Hartford Connecticut company by the name of Billings and Spencer. They state that they were produced exclusively for Pope Mfg. Co. 

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With a Patent date of 1889 this oiler would have been included in the tool kits of Ordinary or High Wheeler bicycles.

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 A Compass "Compliments of Pope Mfg. Co. - Boston" dated 1892 and possibly given out at the 1892 Columbian Exposition. 

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A 1902 Columbia Desk Calendar. This rare example is completely intact and the metal frame has never been bent out to sit on a desk. These Calendars were available for many years from Pope Mfg based on magazine ads available. They had a different quote every day promoting the value of owning and riding Columbia bikes of course. 

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Paper hats from 1950. 1950 was an important year for Columbia with the introduction of all new models and a huge advertising campaign. These hats may have been worn by Columbia dealers during one of those promotions. 

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